How GameStop does Talent Development – Big Ideas in a Small Car EP 5

How GameStop does Talent Development – Big Ideas in a Small Car EP 5


(energetic music) – Hey, Jeff, how are you, man? – Hey man, how are you?
– Good to see you. – Good to see you. – Yeah, likewise. – Down to marking today, huh? – Yeah look at this, man. – Got a huge sale, oh yeah. – Wow, man.
– Here it is. – Look at this. Do we just lift it up and carry it? – We can, if we want we can
sell it inside if we need to. Let’s get out of here.
– Alright, thanks, man. – How are things at GameStop
today? We doing well? – Good, crazy busy, yeah, which is the way we like it. – I’ll tell you what, before we get going and while we’re here, I don’t get out to the stores very often, I was wondering if I could talk with you about some trinkets. This is a vintage, classic football. – Very nice, very nice.
– Turn it on, turn it on. – I mean, it works, and look at this. – Look at that. – Well the batteries. Okay, well how about this, this is a Game Boy cartridge. – You got a shop in the back here? – How about a console?
– Very nice. – Super Nintendo, that
comes with Super Mario Kart. This is some relatively newer technology. A Game Cube. – Ah, nice. – No, no, I’m playing. So, so far, pretty good. – Ah, yeah, you’re doing well, man. – ‘Kay. Alright, well let’s go for a ride. (fast-paced music) Well, so how are you
developing talent then? – So we have a proprietary platform that we call Level Up Interactive, and it is a self-developed, fully gameified platform. So it’s the way that people like to learn, we also have a level
up leadership platform that we use for the stores and for our corporate offices and our PC and our
refurb operation center. But basically, we wanna
bring learning to you in the way that you’d like to receive it. So we’re gonna make it fun, we’re gonna make it competitive,
it’s gonna be interactive. – Can I earn points? – You can earn points, you
can have your own avatar, you’re gonna earn different
options for your avatar as you earn more points,
you’re gonna compete against the folks up the street because you know them. – You wanna, wanna beat them. – Absolutely, so you’re
gonna do all you can to, you can have leaderboards, you’re gonna position yourself on that leaderboard favorably, and we make it just a lot of fun. We’re really looking
for people who like to, and I will call this, imagine like a child and think like an adult. – Whoa, that’s not, sounds like a book. – It’s not a book yet. – Yet! Okay. – Think about for a second, the leaders that you’ve known throughout the years that
have been exceptional. They very often know
how to create new ideas, innovate, be courageous with their ideas, and do what you and I
did when we were kids, kinda sit under a tree and imagine a different possibility
than we have right now. But, you gotta make money. So, you gotta figure out how- – It is the number one rule of business. – Yep, take the ideas that make sense, figure out how you can
sustain those ideas, and also figure out
how you can make money. – Okay, okay, well so how do
we go about doing that, then? – People will tell me, Jeff,
that they’re not creative, I don’t believe them. – People say that to me all the time, I agree with you completely. It’s a frame of mind, really. Everyone’s creative about something. – You’ve been creative in the past, you’ve offered some courageous ideas, inventive ideas, and they haven’t worked. Anyone who’s creative is gonna fail probably 40 or 50% of the time. Just gonna throw out ideas, and then be courageous about them, they’re gonna be innovative about it, so it’s all about just generating ideas. – Right. – I think there are probably four things that people do, sometimes
one at a time and all four, so think about the last big, epic fail. – You better be careful, I think you’re writing the book right now. – And you might, you
might just self-identify with all four of these. (laughter) – That is a strong possibility of that. – You might just say hey look man, that was me last night, so. – You are revealing my life story. – Yeah, so we’re just
opening you right up, this is like therapy for you guys, so. – Let’s try. – So the first one is,
we tend to catastrophize. – Catastrophize, is that a word? – Yeah, yeah, so we make it big in size. That what’s makes it memorable. – But that’s why you’re writing a book. – Yeah there you go, yeah, we’re just making it up as you go along. The bottom line is we have a setback, often it’s a perceived setback. We just make it much
bigger than it actually is. Most people when they make a mistake or they have a perceived setback, they create this feeling
that it’s much bigger than what it really is, and actually most problems, most setbacks are much smaller than they really are. The second thing that we often do is we personalize it. Sometimes you offer an idea and it’s just not right
for the organization, it’s not affordable for the organization, it’s not an idea that we
can make money off of, and the idea is rejected. – Yeah. – Way too many people see
that rejection as personal, the organization has
rejected me and my thinking, so it’s a rejection of my work. And the third thing that we do sometimes, the crazy thing that we do, is we just, we overanalyze things, so we add so much complexity. – Well that’s incredibly
common at the corporate level. – Oh yeah. – Analysis by paralysis, coming
up with a thousand reasons why you shouldn’t do something instead of focusing on the one, really great reason why you should. – You’re always looking
for solutions that are simple, memorable, actionable, and sustainable. And often we stray from
that basic, simple model to add all these elements to it, and we’ve gotta analyze
it and overanalyze it and over-consider it so, sometimes when we have a setback we think wow, what could
I have done better? Which is healthy, but then stop there
instead of going through all of these mental exercises
where we go through, and it’s interesting,
Jeff, to beat yourself up. So the final thing, Jeff,
that I think about a lot and encourage folks in the
organization to think about is we also tend to memorialize. So we have a tendency sometimes when we have these setbacks, Jeff, is we just think that
they’re gonna last forever, and we dwell on ’em, and
my recommendation to folks if they wanna be more
creative is let it go. It’s a mistake, it’s in the past, face forward, learn from it. We also just wanna help
people feel more comfortable with the mistakes that they make. Consider the difference between two different types of mistakes, Jeff. Think about the mistakes that
you and members of your team- – Why do you keep talking
about the mistakes I make? – I just, better you than me, man. – Okay, fair enough, you’re the guest. – ‘Cause if I have to start
to roll on my mistakes, I don’t think you have
enough gas in the car to get us through that list. – Would you say that it has been a successful way of
retaining and growing talent? – It has been and when you think about what you look for in a job, you’re looking for opportunities to work with other creative people, you’re looking for
opportunities to surface ideas, you’re looking for ways to be rewarded for those ideas, you’re
looking to have fun. We’re the culture that always makes room for people that do that. – Well Matt, it’s very simple to see how this approach has allowed
your people to level up. – Very nice, Jeff. – Just a little plug for you. – There you go, thanks, thanks, man. (fast-paced music) – Ah, well hey! That was fun, wasn’t it? It’s hard to believe you
can get so many big ideas in such a small car. Never miss an episode by subscribing, or you know, check out
our other big ideas. On the road again.


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